BREAKING: Trump announces he will BAN TikTok in the U.S. 

Donald Trump announces he will BAN TikTok in the U.S. by executive order as soon as SATURDAY – and he will not let an American firm buy the operation

  • President Trump told reporters traveling on Air Force One on Friday that he plans to ban TikTok as soon as Saturday 
  • ‘Well, I have that authority. I can do it with an executive order,’ the president said 
  • The popular video-sharing app has raised concerns among officials in the U.S. and around the world, over claims it is being used by China to spy on citizens
  • Trump also said he did not approve of an American company to buy the platform amid reports Microsoft was ‘in talks’ to acquire the app  
  • Parent company ByteDance has consistently denied any links to the Chinese government

President Donald Trump announced on Friday he will ban Chinese-owned social media app TikTok from operating in the United States.

Trump said the popular video-sharing platform could be barred as soon as Saturday by executive order or through use of emergency economic powers.

‘As far as TikTok is concerned, we’re banning them from the United States’ he told reporters on Air Force One as he returned from Florida.

‘Well, I have that authority. I can do it with an executive order or that [emergency economic powers].’

The president also made clear he did not support an American company to purchase TikTok’s U.S. operations after an earlier report claimed Microsoft was ‘in talks’ to acquire the platform.

Trump told reporters he could ban TikTok in the U.S. as soon as Saturday, while traveling back from Tampa on Air Force One Friday

Trump told reporters he could ban TikTok in the U.S. as soon as Saturday, while traveling back from Tampa on Air Force One Friday

TikTok’s wide popularity among American teens has brought scrutiny from U.S. regulators and lawmakers who fear their personal information could fall into the hands of government officials in Beijing 

Microsoft is ‘in talks’ to buy Chinese-owned TikTok after Trump said he is considering banning the video app in the US

The New York Times reported on Friday that Microsoft is in talks to acquire TikTok, according to sources who note the deal could ‘alter the app’s ownership.’

The report comes amid speculation President Trump would mandate Chinese parent company ByteDance to give up ownership of the platform.

TikTok has raised concerns over its potential threat to security, along with claims that the Chinese government is using the technology to spy on citizens.

Microsoft is currently in talks with ByteDance for ownership of TikTok, sources told The New York Times

Microsoft is currently in talks with ByteDance for ownership of TikTok, sources told The New York Times

‘We are looking at TikTok. We may be banning TikTok,’ Trump told reporters at the White House Friday.

‘We are looking at a lot of alternatives with respect to TikTok.’ 

However, it seems Trumps plans may have hit a snag, as Microsoft is currently in talks with ByteDance for ownership.

Anonymous sources told The New York Times that the deal is in the works, but were unclear where the two firms stood.

However, Bloomberg reports that Trump plans to make a decision to order ByteDance to sell its ownership of TikTok in the US. 

TikTok took the world by storm in 2017, which allows users to create original videos that are shared in the app for millions to see.

Currently 80 million Americans use the app, which has raised concerns among the government citing TikTok’s data collection of users that may be in the hands of Chinese officials. 

Talks of banning the popular video app followed shortly after many users attempted to sabotage Trump’s June rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

TikTok users and K-pop fans said they had signed up for the Trump rally in Tulsa – which marked the US President’s return to the trail since campaigning was side-lined by the coronavirus crisis.

Trump’s campaign declared it had more than a million ticket requests, but in the hours before the event, crowds looked significantly lighter than expected at the 19,000-seat BOK Center. In the end, just 6,200 people attended

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Sources told The New York Times on Friday that a deal was in the works, but it was unclear where the two firms stood.

At the same time, reports had claimed Trump was planning to order TikTok’s Chinese parent company, ByteDance to give up ownership of the platform.

Sources familiar with the matter told Reuters the White House, ByteDance and potential buyers of TikTok, including Microsoft failed to produce a deal that would result in the Chinese company shedding the app’s U.S. operations.

The talks are expected to continue in the coming days.

While Microsoft already owns professional social media network LinkedIn, it would face fewer regulatory hurdles in acquiring TikTok than its more direct competitors, such as FaceBook Inc, one of the sources said.

But ByteDance’s valuation expectations for TikTok of more than $50billion, and its insistence on retaining a minority stake in the app complicated deal talks, another source said.

‘Not the deal that you have been hearing about, that they are going to buy and sell… and Microsoft and another one. We are not an M&A (mergers and acquisitions) country,’ Trump said.

TikTok, which has some 800million users around the globe, has raised concern among worldwide and U.S. officials for its potential threat to security, along with claims that the Chinese government is using the technology to spy on citizens.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Wednesday said the app was being looked at by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, which reviews deals by foreign acquirers for potential national security risks. 

Critics have warned of the potential security threat the app could pose because of its Chinese-based parent firm, ByteDance, which has consistently denied any links to the Chinese government. 

The number of American users has been estimated to be as high as 80 million a month – although because the company is not publicly traded, the estimate by outside analysts is impossible to verify.

The platform took the world by storm in 2017, which allows users to create original videos that are shared in the app for millions to see.  

The move comes after Joe Biden’s presidential campaign banned staffers from using the Chinese video sharing app, citing security and privacy concerns.

In a memo on Monday, Biden’s general counsel, Dana Remus, ordered staff members to delete TikTok from both their personal and work phones, and to ‘refrain from downloading and using TikTok,’ according to Bloomberg.

The memo also bans staff from trading individual stocks without approval from the campaign’s general counsel, an unusual step for a presidential campaign.

Earlier this week TikTok pushed back at what it called ‘maligning attacks’ that call attention to the video app’s Chinese connections – a coded reference to the inquiry, and also to what it claims are 

TikTok CEO Kevin Mayer said the attacks were ‘disguised as patriotism and designed to put an end to our very presence in the U.S.’

‘We are not political, we do not accept political advertising and have no agenda — our only objective is to remain a vibrant, dynamic platform for everyone to enjoy,’ Mayer said.

‘TikTok has become the latest target, but we are not the enemy.’

Mayer said TikTok has established a policy on transparency and added that it would go further than others by disclosing more about its internal algorithms.

‘We believe all companies should disclose their algorithms, moderation policies, and data flows to regulators,’ he said. 

TikTok faces regulatory challenges across the globe, and a potential ban by the U.S. government over suspicions Beijing could force its Chinese owner to turn over user data. China's President Xi Jinping is photographed in May

TikTok faces regulatory challenges across the globe, and a potential ban by the U.S. government over suspicions Beijing could force its Chinese owner to turn over user data. China’s President Xi Jinping is photographed in May 

Founder: ByteDance, TikTok's parent company, was founded by Zhang Yiming, who is accused of Communist party links

Founder: ByteDance, TikTok’s parent company, was founded by Zhang Yiming, who is accused of Communist party links

TikTok faces regulatory challenges across the globe, and a potential ban by the U.S. government over suspicions Beijing could force its Chinese owner to turn over user data is the latest threat.

‘While we do not comment on rumors or speculation, we are confident in the long-term success of TikTok,’ TikTok said in a statement.

HOW DOES IT WORK? 

  • Users post videos of themselves and broadcast them on the app
  • Anyone can find these videos and post comments on them
  • It also allows you to message that person privately
  • Some of the most popular videos are watched more than 10 million times
  • Each TikTok video is generally 15 to 60 seconds long
  • The videos are typically set to music, often showing the user dancing, doing a trick, or lip-syncing
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As relations between the United States and China deteriorate over trade, Hong Kong´s autonomy, cyber security and the spread of the novel coronavirus, TikTok has emerged as a flashpoint in the dispute between the world´s two largest economies.

Last week, the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs unanimously passed a bill that would bar U.S. federal employees from using TikTok on government-issued devices. It will be taken up by the full Senate for a vote. The House of Representatives has already voted for a similar measure.

ByteDance has been considering a range of options for TikTok amid pressure from the United States to relinquish control of the app, which allows users to create short videos with special effects and has become wildly popular with U.S. teenagers.

ByteDance has received a proposal from some of its investors, including Sequoia and General Atlantic, to transfer majority ownership of TikTok to them, Reuters reported on Wednesday. The proposal values TikTok at about $50 billion, but some ByteDance executives believe the app is worth more than that.

ByteDance has also fielded acquisition interest in TikTok from other companies and investment firms, Reuters has reported.

The Tears of TikTok: Social media stars with millions of followers bid farewell to the popular video-sharing app where they shot to fame after President Trump announces he’s banning the Chinese-owned platform

By Karen Ruiz for Dailymail.com

TikTok stars are bidding farewell to the popular video-sharing app after President Trump announced he was banning the Chinese-owned platform on Saturday, amid national security concerns. 

The social media outlet, where users can create 15 or 60 second videos, has grown wildly popular among young people over the last year and is estimated to be used by more than 80million Americans.

As news of the ban broke on Friday, TikTok stars rushed to say their final goodbyes to the app where they found celebrity status, asking fans to follow them on Instagram or YouTube instead.

Scroll down for video

TikTok mega-star Dixie D'Amelio, who boasts 32 million followers, uploaded a video of herself reacting to the demise of the app

Dixie

TikTok mega-star Dixie D’Amelio, who boasts 32 million followers, uploaded a video of herself reacting to the demise of the app

Skin care guru Hyram, who gained a following after sharing tips on beauty and skin care products, shared a farewell video to 5.4millon followers on Friday

Skin care guru Hyram, who gained a following after sharing tips on beauty and skin care products, shared a farewell video to 5.4millon followers on Friday

The D'Amelio sisters, Dixie, 18, and Charli, 20, are among young stars who have made a career from TikTok, after videos of their dances went viral. Charli (left) is currently the most-followed user on the app, with  75.1million fans

The D’Amelio sisters, Dixie, 18, and Charli, 20, are among young stars who have made a career from TikTok, after videos of their dances went viral. Charli (left) is currently the most-followed user on the app, with  75.1million fans

Among them was popular skin care guru SkincarebyHyram, who has amassed 5.2 million followers in recent months by sharing videos of his beauty and skincare tips.

‘Goodbye y’all. You have all made my life incredible for the last five months. I’ll miss our memories, seeing your beautiful faces and all the laughs,’ he said in a video. 

‘Remember: Keep that skin GLOWING.’ 

TikTok mega-star and singer Dixie D’Amelio, also uploaded a video of herself reacting to the demise of the app, staring blankly at the camera as her song ‘Be Happy’ played in the background.

Dixie, 18, and sister Charli, 16, from Norwalk, Connecticut, became two of the most popular users on TikTok, which they joined last summer, after videos of their singing and dancing went viral.

Charli, who is yet to react to the ban, is currently the most-followed star on TikTok, boasting 75.1 million followers, while her older sister has 32 million.   

The girls have been known to make videos with fellow TikTok celeb Addison Rae, who is followed by 53.3million users.

Addison, 19, took to Twitter after learning the news, asking followers to ‘send flowers pls’.

TikTok has propelled the careers of many young social media users including Addison Rae, who is followed by 53.3million users and has created videos with Kardashian sisters

Addison Rae

TikTok has propelled the careers of many young social media users including Addison Rae, who is followed by 53.3million users and has created videos with Kardashian sisters 

Addison took to Twitter to react to the news of the platform being banned

Addison took to Twitter to react to the news of the platform being banned

TMZ reports that the 16-year-old was threatened on social media by a user who said they'd come to her family's house in Norwalk, Connecticut

Earlier this year, 16-year-old Charli D’Amelio (pictured on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon)  became the first TikTok star to land a Super Bowl commercial when she appeared in an ad for Sabra Hummus

Popular TikTokers Tony Lopez and Michael Le, also known as JustMaiko, each shared videos asking fans to find him on other social media platforms before the app shuts down for good. 

‘Well s**t. F**k. Follow me on Instagram I guess. This might be it,’ Lopez said.

The shuttering of the app will not only be a loss to the millions of fans joined to participate in viral trends, but it has sparked concerns for those who now use it to make a living.  

Tik Tok has produced a community young celebrities, many of whom have been able to make careers as influencers after landing lucrative sponsorships with brands.

Earlier this year, Charli D’Amelio became the first TikTok star to land a Super Bowl commercial when she appeared in an ad for Sabra Hummus.

As for getting paid for social media content, the teenager reportedly charges up to $100,000 per post, according to Cosmopolitan. 

Charli and Dixie have also partnered with Hollister and makeup brand Morphe in the last few months alone. 

The same goes for Addison Rae, who joined TikTok last July and has since amassed a massive following, with 3.1billion likes, and has been featured in videos with the Kardashians.  

Michael Le, also known as JustMaiko, has amassed 34.5million followers through his popular dancing videos

TikToker Tony Lopez also asked his 21million followers to find him on other social media platforms before the app shut down for good

 Michael Le, also known as JustMaiko (left) has amassed 34.5million followers through his popular dancing videos. He and fellow TikToker Tony Lopez shared videos asking followers to find them on other social media platforms before the app shut down for good

‘If TikTok actually gets banned please support your favorite creators and follow them on all other social platforms immediately. Your support means more than you know,’ one Twitter user said on Friday. 

TikTok has raised concern among worldwide and U.S. officials for its potential threat to security, along with claims that the Chinese government is using the technology to spy on citizens. 

On Friday, Trump said the popular video-sharing platform could be barred as soon as Saturday by executive order or through use of emergency economic powers.

‘As far as TikTok is concerned, we’re banning them from the United States’ he told reporters on Air Force One as he returned from Florida.

‘Well, I have that authority. I can do it with an executive order or that [emergency economic powers].’

The president also made clear he did not support an American company to purchase TikTok’s U.S. operations after an earlier report claimed Microsoft was ‘in talks’ to acquire the platform.

Trump told reporters he could ban TikTok in the U.S. as soon as Saturday, while traveling back from Tampa on Air Force One Friday

Trump told reporters he could ban TikTok in the U.S. as soon as Saturday, while traveling back from Tampa on Air Force One Friday

TikTok’s wide popularity among American teens has brought scrutiny from U.S. regulators and lawmakers who fear their personal information could fall into the hands of government officials in Beijing 

Sources told The New York Times on Friday that a deal was in the works, but it was unclear where the two firms stood.

At the same time, reports had claimed Trump was planning to order TikTok’s Chinese parent company, ByteDance to give up ownership of the platform.

Sources familiar with the matter told Reuters the White House, ByteDance and potential buyers of TikTok, including Microsoft failed to produce a deal that would result in the Chinese company shedding the app’s U.S. operations.

The talks are expected to continue in the coming days.

Twitter users reacted to Trump's decision to ban TikTok, which has produced a number of young stars who now rely on it for their livelihood

Twitter users reacted to Trump’s decision to ban TikTok, which has produced a number of young stars who now rely on it for their livelihood

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Wednesday said the app was being looked at by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, which reviews deals by foreign acquirers for potential national security risks.  

ByteDance  has consistently denied any links to the Chinese government. 

TikTok issued a statement Friday saying that, ‘While we do not comment on rumors or speculation, we are confident in the long-term success of TikTok.’

ByteDance launched TikTok in 2017, then bought Musical.ly, a video service popular with teens in the US and Europe, and combined the two. A twin service, Douyin, is available for Chinese users.

TikTok’s fun, goofy videos and ease of use has made it immensely popular, and US tech giants like Facebook and Snapchat see it as a competitive threat.

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